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Wednesday, April 8, 2020

Harvest Jubilee celebrates fall at the Outback Farm

Western students learn how to make apple cider at the Outback Farm Thursday, Oct. 29.
Western students learn how to make apple cider at the Outback Farm Thursday, Oct. 29.

The Outback farm was brimming with life during the Harvest Jubilee, the first introduction of the event Thursday, Oct. 29. About 40 students participated in a cider-making workshop, painting pumpkins, and socialized around a campfire.

In the fall, there is so much that happens on a farm that is a joyous and celebratory time, senior Liliana Morgan, the Outback Farm Coordinator, said. After working all year, people can enjoy the fruits of their labor, she said.

“People would say that they didn’t know the Outback was here, so we thought a celebration would welcome people in,” Morgan said. “We wanted students to get familiar with our program and engage them in agricultural practices.” The Outback is near Fairhaven Residences.

Other activities were a three-legged race, eating a doughnut on a string game, a green tomato tossing game, a photo booth with costumes available. The band, Charlie and the Rays, played in the Outback Amphitheater.

In the cider-pressing workshop, students were taught to cut up apples and put them through a grinder, which operated with a small generator. They transferred buckets of pieces of apples to a press and several people took turns operating the press to make cider.

Junior Issac Newell, an environmental science major, was one of the students who tossed apples into the grinder and used a stick to guide them through it. “I had never used a grinder or seen one before,” Newell said. “It was fun. I haven’t spent time in the community garden so it’s cool to see what’s going on.”

Members of the Outback farm program collaborated with Associated Student Productions to host Harvest Jubilee. “The goal is to highlight the Environmental and Sustainability Program’s Outback and make students more aware of the space,” senior Alexander LaVallee, Associated Students Productions Special Events Coordinator, a Fairhaven student, said. “Even if you have a garden or environment interest, it’s a relaxing place to walk through. The program is funded by student funds.”

During the jubilee, students were encouraged to explore the Outback farm and learn more about it.

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