70.4 F
Bellingham
Monday, August 3, 2020

New Year’s resolutions: where are they now?

Photo by Emma Calvert

By Emma Calvert

New Year’s resolutions are something I have always made but rarely followed through on. I find it so easy to get caught up in everything happening in my life and so often end up falling into old habits. After all, they are called habits for a reason.

This new year has been an insane period of change in my life. From coming to terms with the fact that I have anxiety alongside a plethora of other problems, it has been easy to get down on myself and fall back into old routines.

For this exact reason, I have determined that for me, 2019 will be the year of self-love and happiness.

I try to live in the moment and relish in the small bits of happiness I find throughout the day. I allow myself to be proud of my accomplishments and experiences, and I appreciate all the emotions I have the opportunity to feel on all ends of the emotional spectrum. Whether this happiness is found in the form of a new leaf sprouting on my fig tree, standing in a warm patch of sun or stopping to watch the sunset on a busy day.

I will admit that I have faltered on my New Year’s resolution, especially when I get caught up in the stress of school. With the flurry of tests and projects that midterms brought, I found myself rushing more often than not to get through my day, which often ended in me feeling drained and sad when it came time to lay my head down.

When I get caught up and fall short of my resolution, I have to remind myself that there is always joy to be found somewhere.

Photo by Emma Calvert

I find that by recognizing my shortcomings, and recognizing that every day may not be the best, I am more able to love and appreciate the good that exists in my life.

This year I am determined to love myself whether I am happy, sad or any other emotion under the sun. At the end of the day, good or bad, I will always have the patches of sunshine, a funny joke, a growing houseplant or self-love to hold me together.

2 COMMENTS

  1. Thanks Emma – things I never knew about you and not the easiest things to share perhaps. In a nutshell, searching for the joy in every situation (good or bad) is a great way to live.

  2. Emma, this is beautiful! I will think of you when I hug the sun-warmed door of my portable classroom on the otherwise chilly days.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

3,945FansLike
1,241FollowersFollow
5,455FollowersFollow
0SubscribersSubscribe

Must Read

Resident advisers hold open forum with university officials to discuss concerns

Written by: Bram Briskorn and Questen Inghram Over 300 people packed into Arntzen Hall, room 100 as if it were...

Sports: Pros and cons of Seahawks’ NFL draft pick Malik McDowell

Why did the Seahawks go after a defensive tackle with their first selection in the 2017 NFL draft? Coming off...

New judge in town

Three candidates running for Whatcom County judge face each other in an open forum.

Latest News

Post-apocalyptic movies: morbid fascination or healthy coping mechanism?

With the pandemic taking a toll on the country, people are resorting to more virtual...

Local roller derby league leaves the bruises at home and rolls with the pandemic.

The local roller derby league has started a weekly event that follows current mask and distancing guidelines.

Lake Whatcom protected for another 4 years

The Lake Whatcom Management Program has been extended to protect the lake and surrounding watershed.

Western offers free food to students during pandemic.

A pop-up pantry is open at the Viking Union Thursdays from 12-2 p.m. for students to pick up non-perishables and...

Washington experts work with Whatcom helpers against shellfish poisoning

County and state health departments, Lummi Tribe and others monitor local waters to protect shellfish eaters from paralytic shellfish poisoning 

More Articles Like This