68.3 F
Bellingham
Sunday, May 16, 2021

The show must go on

A performer uses balls attached to string to present his fire spinning skills at the Everlife Entertainment fire spinning event Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. // Photo by Madisyn Alexander
A performer uses balls attached to string to present his fire spinning skills at the Everlife Entertainment fire spinning event Sunday, Oct. 16, 2016. // Photo by Madisyn Alexander

Although the sun had set, Locust Beach conserved its radiance through the night with the spinning of flammable fans, balls, swords and more.

Regardless of the weekend’s constant rainfall and abrasive wind, EverLife Entertainment stuck through the weather conditions and continued their monthly fire-spinning event at Locust Beach on Sunday, Oct. 16.

EverLife Entertainment is a travelling organization created and performed by Alara Corvus, Tettra Hydra and Ignus Amare, that brings the fire art, also known as flow, to people who haven’t had the chance to experience it.

“I love the entertainment aspect,” Amare said. “We bring enjoyment into people’s hearts and their lives by adding a flavor that they don’t normally get to enjoy.”

“It takes some bravery to play with fire.”

Sophomore Robert Pugh

Alongside the fire performances, EverLife Entertainment encourages community collaboration by urging photographers, musicians and artists to contribute to their shows, Corvus said.

“We want to be successful and provide entertainment for people,” Corvus said. “Part of our job with the flow arts is providing fire and light entertainment, but like Tettra teaches hula hoop classes, and so we just want to expand that and share it with the world.”

While flow is a beautiful art form, performers still need to be aware of the risks that come along with learning how to interact with fire.

“I was nervous and definitely burned myself a lot, it’s very dangerous and it’s a process of elimination,” Hydra said. “Finding other people that are doing what I’m doing, and learning from them is the best way that I’ve been able to learn anything, as far as fire spinning or circus arts in general.”

Community members watched the flow professionals flash streaks of fire around their bodies while remaining unharmed.  

“It’s really cool and definitely something I can’t do,” sophomore Robert Pugh said. “It takes some bravery to play with fire.”

The smaller number of people within Sunday night’s audience created a relaxing vibe and allowed for more interaction among the fire-spinning enthusiasts.

These events benefit the community because people that are down to earth and interested in fire spinning will enjoy the small gathering, so you can get to know people one on one, junior Corey Pargeter said.

EverLife Entertainment will continue to perform fire spinning at Locust Beach on the third Sunday of each month.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

4,046FansLike
1,241FollowersFollow
5,577FollowersFollow
77SubscribersSubscribe

Trending

Latest News

Western makes headway on Black student spaces and housing

In accordance with the BSO demands, Western is in the process of designating a dedicated space for Black students...

More Articles Like This